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HDFS Researcher Honored with Early Career Award

HDFS Researcher Honored with Early Career Award

Nicole Perry, an assistant professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin, has been named the winner of the 2022 Victoria S. Levin Award. 

Bill Chopik Awarded Gerontological Society of America Award

Bill Chopik Awarded Gerontological Society of America Award

The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), the nation's leading interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging, has named Bill Chopik among the outstanding award winners for the year, in recognition of his research on gratitude, aging and whether cultural experiences come into play.

The Richard Kalish Innovative Publication Award was awarded to Chopik for the article, "Grateful expectations: Cultural differences in the curvilinear association between age and gratitude." The award recognized insightful and innovative publications on aging and life course development in the behavioral and social sciences.

Stress Makes Couples Focus on Their Partner’s Worst Habits

Stress Makes Couples Focus on Their Partner’s Worst Habits

Stress can cause romantic couples to focus on their partner's most annoying bad habits, according to a new study from Lisa Neff, a University of Texas at Austin associate professor of human development and family sciences, whose work was featured in several prominent media publications.

he study was published in September in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

"We found that individuals who reported experiencing more stressful life events outside of their relationship, such as problems at work, were especially likely to notice if their partner behaved in an inconsiderate manner," Neff said.

Young Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Adults Have Worse Mental Health than Older Ones

Young Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Adults Have Worse Mental Health than Older Ones

A new study by The University of Texas at Austin and the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law finds younger LGBQ adults are physically healthier but have worse psychological health than older LGBQ people.

Researchers examined a representative sample of LGBQ people in the United States from three age groups—young (18-25), middle (34-41), and older (52-59)—to assess how physical and mental health differed among the three generations. Researchers compared several indicators, including alcohol and drug abuse, general and physical health, mental health and psychological distress and positive well-being.

Results showed no difference among the groups in substance abuse or positive well-being. However, several differences were noted when data were analyzed by sexual minority subgroups and gender. Bisexual people were more likely to report drug abuse and have less happiness, social well-being, and life satisfaction compared with gay and lesbian people. Nonbinary people reported worse general health, more psychological distress, and less positive well-being compared to women.

How to Best Support LGTBQ Youth, According to Science

How to Best Support LGTBQ Youth, According to Science

Pride Month is a time of celebration every June. This year's commemoration also comes at a time of heightened attention to the mental health concerns of young LGBTQ people. Recent research has shown these youth may be experiencing more concerns than older LGBTQ people. 

We spoke with Stephen Russell, who leads the SOGI (sexual orientation and gender identity) Health and Rights Laboratory at UT Austin. A professor and chair of the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, Director of the School of Human Ecology and its Amy Johnson McLaughlin Chair, Russell is one of the foremost experts on the development of LGBTQ young people. In conversation, he shared what everyone needs to know about supporting younger members of the LGBTQ community.