Stephen D. Hursting

Stephen Hursting

Department Chair and Professor and Margaret McKean Love Chair in Nutrition

NTR Faculty
Office: DPI 2.834
Office: PAI 3.26
Lab: DPI 2.706

Phone

Office: 512-495-3021
Office: 512-471-2809
Fax: Lab 512-495-4929
Fax: 512-495-4945

Email

Work: shursting@austin.utexas.edu

Postdoctoral Research, Cancer Prevention Fellow, National Cancer Institute

Ph.D., Nutritional Biochemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

M.P.H., Nutritional Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

B.A., Biology, Earlham College

Dr. Hursting is the Professor and Margaret McKean Love Chair in Nutrition, Cellular and Molecular Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, and Professor of Carcinogenesis, UT-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

Major Research Interests

Diet-gene interactions relevant to cancer prevention, particularly the molecular and hormonal mechanisms underlying energy balance-cancer associations.

Education and Previous Positions

Dr. Hursting earned a BA in biology from Earlham College and a Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry and an MPH in nutritional epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He also completed postdoctoral training in molecular biology and cancer prevention as a Cancer Prevention Fellow at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). From 1995 to 1999, Dr. Hursting was an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Carcinogenesis at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer, where he directed a multidisciplinary research program in nutrition and cancer prevention. He continues his affiliation with his former departments at the MD Anderson Cancer Center as a Professor of Carcinogenesis and Adjunct Associate Professor of Epidemiology.

From 1999-2005, Dr. Hursting was Deputy Director of the NCI’s Office of Preventive Oncology, Division of Cancer Prevention. He was responsible for all aspects of the NCI’s Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. Dr. Hursting was also an Investigator in the NCI’s Center for Cancer Research, where he was Chief of the Nutrition and Molecular Carcinogenesis Section of the NCI’s Laboratory of Biosystems and Cancer. His research program focuses on the nutritional modulation of the carcinogenesis process, with a particular emphasis on the molecular, cellular and hormonal changes underlying important nutrition and cancer associations, with a focus on energy balance/obesity.

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