Theodore H. (Ted) Dix

dix

Associate Professor

HDFS Faculty
Office: SEA 2.430

Phone

Office: 512-471-4912
Lab: 512-471-3921
Fax: 512-475-8662

Email

Work: teddix@mail.utexas.edu

Research Interests

Ted Dix’s work examines parenting competence and its role in developmental risk in the first five to eight years of life. As a point of departure, it is concerned with moment-to-moment processing factors that regulate parents and children’s emotional states, parents’ ability to coordinate parent-child exchanges, and the tendency of the dyad to achieve mutual goals cooperatively. In many families, mothers’ depressive symptoms play a key role in such exchanges. A focal point of this work is understanding the complex factors that determine how and why depressive symptoms disrupt both parenting and diverse aspects of early socioemotional development.

Select Publications

Dix, T., Meunier, L. N., Lusk, K., & Perfect. M. (2012). Mothers’ depressive symptoms and children’s facial emotion: Examining the depression-inhibition hypothesis. Development and Psychopathology, 24, 195-210.

Dix, T., & Meunier, L. N. (2009). Depressive symptoms and parenting competence: An analysis of thirteen regulatory processes. Developmental Review, 29, 45-68.

Bryan, A. E., & Dix, T. (2009). Mothers’ emotions and supportive behavior during interactions with toddlers: The role of child temperament. Social Development,18, 647-670.

Dix, T., Cheng, N., & Day, W. (2009). Connecting with parents: Mothers’ depressive symptoms and responsive behaviors in the regulation of social contact by 1- and young 2-year-olds. Social Development, 18, 24-50.

Dix, T., Stewart, A. D., Gershoff, E. T., & Day, W. H. (2007). Autonomy and children’s reactions to being controlled: Evidence that both compliance and defiance may be positive markers in early development. Child Development, 78, 1204-1221.

Courses Recently Taught

Undergraduate
HDF 313 – Child Development
HDF 358 – Parent-Child Relationships

Graduate
HDF 398T – College Teaching
HDF 394  – Parent-Child Interaction