Handbook for the Coordinated Program in Dietetics at The University of Texas at Austin

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Program Description

Accreditation Status

The Coordinated Program in Dietetics at the University of Texas at Austin is granted accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), 120 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago IL 60606, (312) 899-0040.

Mission of the Coordinated Program in Dietetics

The Mission of the Coordinated Program in Dietetics is to qualify graduates for entry-level positions, graduate study and advancement to positions of leadership in clinical, administrative or community dietetics. Balanced preparation in the primary areas of dietetics that is built on a strong foundation of academic preparation recognizes the need for practitioners with clinical, foodservice management and community skills in the vast non-urban expanse of Texas.

Goals of the Coordinated Program in Dietetics

The Coordinated Program is planned to achieve the following goals.

  1. Prepare students for successful entry into the dietetics profession.
  2. Provide credentialed dietitians for the state of Texas.
  3. Prepare professionals capable of advancement in their chosen area of dietetics practice and encourage graduates to become leaders in the dietetics profession.

Outcome Measures for Coordinated Program Goals

Achievement of program goals with the following outcome measures:

Prepare students for successful entry into the dietetics profession.

  • The majority of students entering CP will complete the program within 18 months of starting the program.
  • The majority of students completing CP will earn a passing score on first sitting for the Registration Exam for Dietitians administered by CDR
  • Mean scaled score of graduates sitting for registration exam will be above national mean for the total exam, and the nutrition and foodservice management sections
  • The majority of students completing CP who seek employment in dietetics will be employed in dietetics or a related field within 12 months of program completion
  • The majority of program graduates will rate their preparation for major dietetics skills as 4 (well-prepared) or 3 (prepared) on a 4-point scale
  • The majority of first-time employers of students who have graduated from CP will rate their preparation in major dietetics skills as a 5 (excellent) or 4 (more than satisfactory) on a 5-point scale

The program will provide credentialed dietitians for the state of Texas

  • Over half of graduates will work as dietitians in Texas

The program will prepare professionals capable of advancement in their chosen area of dietetics practice and encourage graduates to become leaders in the dietetics profession.

  • Many graduates employed in dietetics for five or more years will achieve advanced certification within 10 years of program completion
  • Many of graduates employed in clinical dietetics for five or more years will practice in an area of specialization such as diabetes, kidney disease, pediatrics or oncology.
  • Many of graduates employed in dietetics for five or more years will hold or have held elected or appointed positions of leadership in local, state or national dietetic associations.

Program outcome data is available upon request.

Student Competencies for Dietetic Practice

Graduates of the program will demonstrate the following knowledge/skills (KR) and dietetic practice competencies (CP):

Scientific and Evidence Base of Practice: integration of scientific information and research into practice

Knowledge

KRD 1.1  The curriculum must reflect the scientific basis of the dietetics profession and must include research methodology, interpretation of research literature and integration of research principles into evidence- based practice.

Competencies

Upon completion of the program, graduates are able to:

CRD 1.1  Select indicators of program quality and/or customer service and measure achievement of objectives.

CRD 1.2  Apply evidence-based guidelines, systematic reviews and scientific literature (such as the Academy’s Evidence Analysis Library and Evidence-based Nutrition Practice Guidelines, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Guideline Clearinghouse Web sites) in the nutrition care process and model and other areas of dietetics practice

CRD 1.3  Justify programs, products, services and care using appropriate evidence or data

CRD 1.4  Evaluate emerging research for application in dietetics practice

CRD 1.5  Conduct projects using appropriate research methods, ethical procedures and data analysis

Professional Practice Expectations: beliefs, values, attitudes and behaviors for the professional dietitian level of practice.

Knowledge

KRD 2.1  The curriculum must include opportunities to develop a variety of communication skills sufficient for entry into pre-professional practice.

KRD 2.2  The curriculum must provide principles and techniques of effective counseling methods.

KRD 2.3  The curriculum must include opportunities to understand governance of dietetics practice, such as the Scope of Dietetics Practice and the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics; and interdisciplinary relationships in various practice settings.

Competencies

Upon completion of the program, graduates are able to:

CRD 2.1  Practice in compliance with current federal regulations and state statutes and rules, as applicable and in accordance with accreditation standards and the Scope of Dietetics Practice and Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics

CRD 2.2  Demonstrate professional writing skills in preparing professional communications

CRD 2.3  Design, implement and evaluate presentations to a target audience

CRD 2.4  Use effective education and counseling skills to facilitate behavior change

CRD 2.5  Demonstrate active participation, teamwork and contributions in group settings

CRD 2.6  Assign patient care activities to DTRs and/or support personnel as appropriate.

CRD 2.7  Refer clients and patients to other professionals and services when needs are beyond individual scope of practice

CRD 2.8  Apply leadership skills to achieve desired outcomes

CRD 2.9  Participate in professional and community organizations

CRD 2.10   Establish collaborative relationships with other health professionals and support personnel to deliver effective nutrition services.

CRD 2.11 Demonstrate professional attributes within various organizational cultures

CRD 2.12   Perform self assessment, develop goals and objectives and prepare a draft portfolio for professional development as defined by the Commission on Dietetic Registration

CRD 2.13   Demonstrate negotiation skills

Clinical and Customer Services: development and delivery of information, products and services to individuals, groups and populations

Knowledge

KRD 3.1  The curriculum must reflect the principles of Medical Nutrition Therapy and the practice of the nutrition care process, including principles and methods of assessment, diagnosis, identification and implementation of interventions and strategies for monitoring and evaluation.

KRD 3.2  The curriculum must include the role of environment, food, nutrition and lifestyle choices in health promotion and disease prevention.

KRD 3.3  The curriculum must include education and behavior change theories and techniques.

Competencies

Upon completion of the program, graduates are able to:

CRD 3.1  Perform the Nutrition Care Process (a through e below) and use standardized nutrition language for individuals, groups and populations of differing ages and health status, in a variety of settings

  1. Assess the nutritional status of individuals, groups and populations in a variety of settings where nutrition care is or can be delivered
  2. Diagnose nutrition problems and create problem, etiology, signs and symptoms (PES) statements
  3. Plan and implement nutrition interventions to include prioritizing the nutrition diagnosis, formulating a nutrition prescription, establishing goals and selecting and managing intervention
  4. Monitor and evaluate problems, etiologies, signs, symptoms and the impact of interventions on the nutrition diagnosis
  5. Complete documentation that follows professional guidelines, guidelines required by health care systems and guidelines required by the practice setting

CRD 3.2 Demonstrate effective communications skills for clinical and customer services in a variety of formats.

CRD 3.3 Develop and deliver products, programs or services that promote consumer health, wellness and lifestyle management

CRD 3.4 Deliver respectful, science-based answers to consumer questions concerning emerging trends

CRD 3.5 Coordinate procurement, production, distribution and service of goods and services.

CRD 3.6 Develop and evaluate recipes, formulas and menus for acceptability and affordability that accommodate the cultural diversity and health needs of various populations, groups and individuals

Practice Management and Use of Resources: strategic application of principles of management and systems in the provision of services to individuals and organizations

Knowledge

KRD 4.1 The curriculum must include management and business theories and principles required to deliver programs and services.

KRD 4.2  The curriculum must include content related to quality management of food and nutrition services.

KRD 4.3 The curriculum must include the fundamentals of public policy, including the legislative and regulatory basis of dietetics practice.

KRD 4.4 The curriculum must include content related to health care systems.

KRD 4.5 The curriculum must include content related to coding and billing of dietetics/nutrition services to obtain reimbursement for services from public or private insurers

Competencies

Upon completion of the program, graduates are able to:

CRD 4.1  Participate in management of human resources

CRD 4.2  Perform management functions related to safety, security and sanitation that affect employees, customers, patients, facilities and food

CRD 4.3  Participate in public policy activities, including both legislative and regulatory initiatives

CRD 4.4  Conduct clinical and customer service quality management activities

CRD 4.5  Use current informatics technology to develop, store, retrieve and disseminate information and data

CRD 4.6  Analyze quality, financial or productivity data and develop a plan for intervention

CRD 4.7  Propose and use procedures as appropriate to the practice setting to reduce waste and protect the environment

CRD 4.8  Conduct feasibility studies for products, programs or services with consideration of costs and benefits.

CRD 4.9  Analyze financial data to assess utilization of resources

CRD 4.10   Develop a plan to provide or develop a product, program or service that includes a budget, staffing needs, equipment and supplies

CRD 4.11 Code and bill for dietetic/nutrition services to obtain reimbursement from public or private insurers.

Concentration area:  Clinical Nutrition

CLN 5.1 Integrate pathophysiology into medical nutrition therapy recommendations

CLN 5.2  Select, monitor, and evaluate complex enteral and parenteral nutrition regimens

Support Knowledge: knowledge underlying the requirements specified above.

KRD 5.1  The food and food systems foundation of the dietetics profession must be evident in the curriculum.

Course content must include the principles of food science and food systems, techniques of food preparation and application to the development, modification and evaluation of recipes, menus and food products acceptable to diverse groups.

KRD 5.2 The physical and biological science foundation of the dietetics profession must be evident in the curriculum. Course content must include organic chemistry, biochemistry, physiology, genetics, microbiology, pharmacology, statistics, nutrient metabolism and nutrition across the lifespan.

KRD 5.3  The behavioral and social science foundation of the dietetics profession must be evident in the curriculum. Course content must include concepts of human behavior and diversity, such as psychology, sociology or anthropology

Dietetics Faculty

 

Monica Meadows, PhD, RD, LD, – is the Director of the Coordinated Program in Dietetics. She has taught many courses during her time on faculty and developed the courses in Nutrition through the Lifecycle, Nutrition Education and Counseling and International Nutrition in the Developing World. In addition to classroom teaching, Dr. Meadows supervised CPD students during their clinical dietetics and community nutrition practice courses until taking over the role of Director. She currently teaches Nutrition Education and Counseling (NTR 330), Nutritional Assessment (NTR 218) and the associated lab (118L)

Office: GEA 30A
Phone: (512) 232-5865
E-mail: MonicaRD@austin.utexas.edu

Ladia Hernandez, PhD, RD, – teaches Issues in Nutrition & Health-Wellness and Foodservice Systems Management lab. Before coming to UT she worked in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Texas – MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) as a Research Dietitian for 10 years where she received an Excellence in Management Award from MDACC in 2011. She has previous work experience as a dietitian in long-term care, adult day care services, and the Head Start program and has taught courses at the undergraduate and graduate level.

Office: 
GEA 313B
Phone: (512) 495 4702
E-mail: ladia.hernandez@austin.utexas.edu

Monica Milonovich, MS, RD, LD – Ms. Milonovich teaches Medical Nutrition Therapy I and II, International Nutrition and supervises CPD students in their clinical and community nutrition supervised practice courses. Her responsibilities include organizing supervised practice rotations and serving as a support system to her students. Ms. Milonovich’s background includes working as a clinical dietitian in ICU and as a Clinical Nutrition Manager with the Seton Healthcare Family.

Office: 30B
Phone: (512) 471-0637
E-mail: mmilonovich@utexas.edu

Diane Papillion, MPH, RD – teaches Community Nutrition and Foodservice Systems Management and the corresponding labs. Previously, she taught introductory nutrition at Texas State University and several Austin based culinary schools. She developed the culinary nutrition curriculum for both the Natural Epicurean and the Austin Art Institute Culinary School. Previously, she was the Nutrition Services Director for Meals on Wheels and More of Travis County. While there, she developed numerous nutrition programs and implemented one of the countries first local food procurement systems for a large non-profit. In 2006, because of her Meals for Kids program, she won the Greater Austin Hispanic Chamber of Commerce community service award in the non-profit leadership category.

Office: GEA 30D
Phone: (512) 471-0037
E-mail: d.papi@utexas.edu

 

Lydia Steinman, MA, RD – Mrs. Steinman is a Distinguished Senior Lecturer and Undergraduate Advisor. She teaches Introduction to Nutritional Sciences and Nutrition through the Life Cycle. She has received multiple awards for teaching excellence from the College of Natural Sciences, the Natural Sciences Council, and the School of Human Ecology.

As an advocate for children’s heath, Mrs. Steinman has worked diligently to promote the adoption of policies that improve the nutritional environment of public schools in Texas. She was a founding member of the School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) for the Austin Independent School District. In addition, Mrs. Steinman has worked with The University of Texas Elementary Charter School in establishing the Healthy Families Initiative, a comprehensive coordinated health program.

Office: GEA 30C
Phone: (512) 232-3363
E-mail: steinman@austin.utexas.edu

Sara Sweitzer PhD, RD, LD – Dr. Sweitzer is the Director of the Didactic Program in Dietetics and teaches Vitamins & Minerals, and Issues in Nutrition & Health-Wellness and Advanced Food Systems Management. She also supervises CPD students during their foodservice management and community nutrition practice courses Her background includes food service management, clinical dietetics and consulting in a variety of settings. Her research area is behavioral nutrition centered on parents and young children.

Office: GEA 331
Phone: (512) 475-9762
E-mail: sjsweitz@austin.utexas.edu

Supervised Practice Policies and Procedures

1. Academic Requirements

Students are required to achieve a minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 each semester, including the semester when selected for the program.  Students must earn a grade of at least C in all required courses.  Program completion requirements include completion of a Bachelor’s degree if student does not already hold a degree at that level, and certification of entry-level competencies on performance evaluations for 1200 hours of supervised practice rotations.  Completion of the program must occur within 18 months of starting the program. Students who fail to maintain the required GPA will be subject to review and possible dismissal from the program.  

Students may be asked to repeat some upper division courses if taken at another university or over five years prior to admission to the program.

Students admitted to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics will be required to meet the program requirements outlined in the most recent Undergraduate Catalog. http://registrar.utexas.edu/catalogs/undergraduate

2. Credit for Prior Experience

Students wishing to transfer credit hours from another institution should work with the UT admissions office to determine transfer credits. 

3. Sequence of Coursework

During the interview process, the student and Program Director will agree on a plan of coursework for completion of the Coordinated Program.  Students are required to complete all didactic coursework during the second semester in the program (senior fall); the only courses that can be taken during the last spring semester and following summer are the dietetic practica courses.  Any changes to this plan must be submitted in writing to the Program Director for prior approval.  Students who fail to complete the coursework as planned are subject to dismissal from the program.

4. Requirements for Completion of Program

Program completion requirements include maintaining a grade-point average of at least 3.0 each semester while in the program, completion of a Bachelor’s degree if student does not already hold a degree at that level, and certification of entry-level competencies on performance evaluations for 1200 hours of supervised practice rotations.  Completion of the program must occur within 18 months of starting the program. If the circumstances of failure to achieve competency warrant such action, at the discretion of the program faculty and preceptors, the student may be allowed to postpone graduation and return at a later date to achieve the required competence.

5. Eligibility/Availability for Supervised Practice

Students accepted to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics must meet the minimum requirements for training in the sites where they are assigned for supervised practice.  These requirements will include a criminal background check, TB test and drug testing. Other conditions as designated by the practice site may also be required.  Students who do not meet these requirements will not be able to complete the program.

Students must arrange their schedules to be available for supervised practice.  Hours are delineated by the individual course and instructor, and/or practice facility and preceptors.  Supervised practice assignments during the second year may be scheduled as early as 4:00 a.m. and as late as 9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday and occasionally on weekends.

Because of the demanding schedule of supervised practice, outside employment is strongly discouraged, especially during the spring and summer semester.  Supervised practice hours cannot be arranged to accommodate employment hours.

6. Academic Calendar

CPD classes follow the University calendar with minor exceptions based on preference and availability of practice facilities.  Students will also be expected to participate in conferences sponsored by the Department of Nutritional Sciences, which often occur during semester breaks. The University academic calendar can be found here: http://registrar.utexas.edu/calendars

7. Attendance

Attendance is mandatory for all supervised practice courses.  If a student cannot be present for a supervised practice activity, he/she is responsible for notifying both the instructor and the contact person at the supervised practice facility before the scheduled activity.

If significant absence (excused or unexcused) occurs during any supervised practice course the student will not be certified as competent in the affected area of practice.  If the circumstances of the absence warrant such action, at the discretion of the program faculty and preceptors, the student may be allowed to postpone graduation and return at a later date to achieve the required competence.

8. Academic and Professional Honesty

Students are expected to practice absolute honesty in all settings – classroom, laboratory and supervised practice.

a.   Honesty and integrity are expected in all activities related to examinations and assignments that are not designated as joint projects.  Dishonesty includes but is not limited to giving or receiving of information/ answers, collusion and falsifying records or the attempt to do so.   Dishonesty will not be tolerated.

b.   Data presented or entered in supervised practice lessons, reports, medical records, case studies, or other assignments or documentation must be carefully and accurately collected and reported.

c.   Plagiarism will not be tolerated.  Quotation marks and/or citations must be used to identify information obtained from the literature and used in reports, case studies, etc.  Failure to comply with these standards will be grounds for disciplinary action including possible dismissal from the program.

9. Code of Ethics

Students are expected to comply with the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics developed jointly by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the Commission on Dietetic Registration.  A copy can be found here:   http://www.eatright.org/codeofethics/

10. Confidentiality of Information

Students are expected to treat as confidential any and all information regarding administration of an affiliation site and/or information regarding its patients, clients or employees obtained in the course of their supervised practice activities.  Failure to treat facility and/or patient information with confidentiality will be grounds for disciplinary action including possible dismissal from the program.

11. Non-discrimination

During supervised practice, students are expected to provide services as needed without regard to age, race, creed, gender, socioeconomic status, medical condition or other factors.

12. Dress Requirements

Students are expected to maintain professional dress for supervised practice assignments.  Specific dress requirements are outlined for each placement.  Dress requirements for most supervised practice will include a professional white lab coat.  Navy blue or black skirt or slacks and white blouse or shirt, closed-toe leather shoes and hairnet will be required for some placements.

13. Travel to and from Sites for Supervised Practice

Students are expected to provide their own transportation to and from sites assigned for supervised practice.  Travel expenses will vary depending on assigned placements which may be as much as 40 miles from campus.  Occasionally assignments may require one to two nights in a hotel.  The University assumes no liability for their safety during this travel.

14. Membership in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND)

Student membership in the American Dietetic Association is required of all students while enrolled in the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.  In addition, students will be required to attend some local and/or state dietetic association meetings.

15. Insurance

Students must maintain health and professional liability insurance while engaged in supervised practice activities during the second year of the program.  Proof of this insurance must be presented at the beginning of each semester.  Except for emergency aid for which the student may be held financially responsible, neither the University nor sites for supervised practice are responsible for health care for students even in case of injury or illness arising at an assigned site for supervised practice.

16. Protection of Privacy of Information/Access to Personal Files

Student files including application materials (except references), transcripts, registration materials, grade slips and periodic evaluations that are maintained in the Director’s office will be available to the student upon his/her written request.  Otherwise, these files are available only to authorized faculty and the program secretary.  Upon entry into the program, students will be required to complete a form entitled “Student Release of Confidential Information.”  Release of addresses, phone numbers, social security numbers and other information will be guided by the individual student’s direction as indicated on this form.  A phone contact must be provided to the direct supervisor for major supervised practice placements.  Social security numbers may be required by some practice sites.

17. Grievance Procedure

Grievance Procedure

Students with a grievance or conflict regarding an assignment, evaluation or other problem arising in a supervised practice course or relating to the requirements of the Coordinated Program in Dietetics should:

a.     First discuss the problem with the instructor with whom the conflict arises*.

b.     If the student is unable to arrive at a satisfactory solution with the instructor, a written description of the problem should be submitted to the Program Director and an appointment set to discuss the matter.

c.     If unable to arrive at a satisfactory solution with the Program Director, discuss the problem with the Chair of the Department of Nutritional Sciences.

d.     If unable to arrive at a satisfactory solution with the Head of the Department of Nutritional Sciences, discuss the problem with the Director of the School of Human Ecology.

e.     If unable to arrive at a satisfactory solution at the departmental level, discuss the problem with designated personnel in the Office of the Dean, College of Natural Science.

*   At each step of the procedure the student should inform the person with whom he/she has talked of his/her intent to carry the grievance to the next level.

18. Disciplinary Action/Termination

Students may be discipline or terminated for reasons including but not limited to: unsatisfactory academic performance, inappropriate behaviors, inappropriate attitudes, unsatisfactory professional development or criminal behavior. Students are expected to know and follow established policies of the program and of each supervised practice site to which they are assigned.  Failure to follow these policies will be grounds for disciplinary action including possible dismissal from the program.

19. Notice of Opportunity to File Complaints with the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education

The Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics will review complaints that relate to a program’s compliance with the accreditation standards.  The Council is interested in the sustained quality and continued improvement of dietetics education programs but does not intervene on behalf of individuals or act as a court of appeal for individuals in matters of admission, appointment, promotion or dismissal of faculty, staff, or students.

A copy of the accreditation/approval standards and/or the Council’s policy and procedure for submission of complaints may be obtained by contacting the Education staff at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 120 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite 200, Chicago, Illinois 60606 or by calling 1-800-877-1600 extension 4872.

Policies for the Coordinated Program in Dietetics have been formulated by the Administrative Committee in consultation with members of the various coordinating committees, students, and divisional and departmental faculties.  Policies are reviewed and revised as necessary by this committee.

20. Retention and Remediation

Our intention is that 100% of students who begin the CPD complete it in its entirety.

To ensure that our students are successful, students will receive formal evaluations from faculty who work closely with them throughout the program at regular intervals.  At the very beginning of their training, students will be required to turn in weekly assignments, which will be graded and returned the following week.  This is one method of regular, weekly evaluation.  The performance on these assignments, paired with formal mid-term and end of semester evaluations allow faculty to evaluate student performance.  In addition, they will also receive informal evaluations/feedback throughout the program from these faculty members as well.

In later semesters, students depend more on preceptors for training and evaluation.  However, faculty still make regular visits to facilities to discuss student progress with the preceptors.  In addition, students communicate with the faculty through semi-weekly emails and attend on-campus days which include case reports and group discussions.

If a student fails to meet expectations the faculty will meet with them as soon as the problem is evident.  The student is reminded of the program policies related to the issue being addressed.  Depending on the circumstances, the student will be given an opportunity to remedy the situation or allowed to leave the program with course credit for the class work that was successfully completed before the problem developed.

21. Verification Statement

Per the The Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) website:

“CDR establishes requirements for eligibility to take the entry-level registration examinations for dietitians and dietetic technicians. Current requirements include academic preparation, supervised practice, and confirmation of academic and practice requirements by verification. These requirements are periodically reviewed and are subject to change.

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

Academic Degree Minimum of a Baccalaureate degree granted by a U.S. regionally accredited college/university or foreign equivalent.

Current Minimum Academic Requirements Completion of an Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) accredited Didactic Program in Dietetics. All Didactic Programs in Dietetics are listed in the Directory of Dietetics Programs. December 31, 1999 is the last postmark date for submitting registration eligibility applications using Plan IV minimum academic requirements.”

Source:

http://www.cdrnet.org/certifications/registration-eligibility-requirements-for-dietitians

Graduates of the CPD who do not already have a baccalaureate degree are awarded a Bachelor’s of Science degree with the dietetics option and a Verification Statement.  CPD graduates who enter the program already possessing a baccalaureate degree must demonstrate successful completion of the program to receive a Verification Statement.  All graduates of the CPD receive an informal certificate of completion.

This statement is a verification of the highest degree earned.  It requires that the following be submitted:

A final transcript for highest degree earned. The official transcript must include the embossed seal or colored stamp of the college/university, the degree earned and the conferral date of the degree.

Or

A letter on college/university letterhead bearing the original signature of the Registrar verifying completion of all degree requirements and the date the degree was conferred. The Registrar’s original signature must be in colored ink on college/university colored letterhead. If this verification letter is black and white the institution’s embossed seal must be applied along with the original signature of the Registrar.

If an individual in the Registrar’s Office, other than the Registrar, has the authority to verify degree(s), an official letter stating that authority must be included with the audit submission documents. The degree confirming statement from the Registrar is NOT the same as the signed Verification Statement from the Didactic Programs in Dietetics Program Director.

Or

An original Foreign Degree Equivalency Report confirming the degree equivalent. Education obtained outside of the US and its territories must have their academic degree(s) validated as equivalent to the Baccalaureate or Master’s degree conferred by a regionally accredited college or university in the US. Validation of a foreign degree does not eliminate the need for a Verification Statement of completion of a Didactic Programs in Dietetics.

Source:

http://www.cdrnet.org/program-director/audit

These are the Verification Statements that are submitted to CDR for eligibility for the RD examination.

22. Educational purpose of supervised practice to prevent the use of students/interns to replace employees

The supervised practice portion of the Coordinated Program in Dietetics in which the student is working at various sites is part of their educational experience.  These work hours fulfill the minimum 1200 hours of supervised practice required by the Commission on Dietetic Registration in order to be eligible to apply to become a registered dietitian.

The supervised practice is of primary benefit to the student (intern) rather than to the site where they are working.  For this reason, the site will not be able to use students (interns) to replace regular employees.

23. Injury or Illness while in supervised practice facility

In the case of an injury, illness or other emergency of a life threatening nature, students should seek emergency treatment.  If the situation is not life threatening, or when the emergency has resolved; the student should contact their preceptor, instructor or program director. Students are responsible for the cost of treatment.

 

 

Dietetic Registration Eligibility

Commission on Dietetic Registration

Job Search Resources

Texas Academy of Nutrition Employment Listing

The Academy Member Career Center